Author Archives: Sally Potts

Restore, Rewild, Realise

Postcode Local TrustBEACON has been successfully awarded a £20,000 grant from the Postcode Local Trust to carry out a habitat restoration project called ‘Restore, Rewild, Realise’.

BEACON will use this grant to ‘Restore’ river banks using natural materials such as willow and hazel hurdles.  Habitats where invasive species have been controlled, but where local flora has been unable to re-establish successfully will be planted up with native wildflowers, plants and trees.  By doing this we will stem the re-growth of invasives and give the natives a competitive advantage, and is the ‘Rewild’ part of the project.  We hope that local volunteers and schools will be involved in restoring habitats and seeing wildlife thrive in restored areas.

Riverbank Restoration Avro Golf Club

The main event as part of this project will be a Bioblitz, held in the summer to educate local children and adults on species identification, habitats, control of invasive species.  By conducting simple nature surveys at this event, they will learn how to record and identify species, and ‘Realise’ the importance of local, native habitats.

This project will take place throughout the course of 2018, and as well as benefitting native   species and habitats, it will also benefit volunteers by providing them with conservation skills and knowledge they may not have previously had.  Schools will also benefit from environmental education workshops being run as part of this project.

The Carrs Ian and Sal black poplar planting

BEACON is extremely thankful to the Postcode Local Trust for awarding us this grant.  Sally Potts, BEACON Project Officer said, ‘BEACON has been financially unable to undertake substantive habitat restoration works, and this will enable us to further progress our work, and build on the success of previous years’.

For more information or to get involved in Restore, Rewild, Realise, please contact us here.

Environment Education Workshops BEACON

Postcode Local Trust is a grant-giving charity funded entirely by players of People’s Postcode Lottery. www.postcodelocaltrust.org.uk

To find out how to play, and thus support more charities please visit http://www.postcodelottery.co.uk

 

Merry Christmas

Wishing all our members and volunteers a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

You can keep up to date with what’s happening in 2018 by checking our Facebook page here, and join in with free training and events advertised here

We hope to see you out balsam bashing, surveying or testing water quality soon 🙂

Species Alert – Asian Hornet

Asian HornetUnfortunately Asian Hornet (Velspa velutina) has been confirmed in North Devon near an apiary.

The Asian hornet is smaller than our native hornet and poses no greater risk to human health than a bee. However, they do pose a risk to honey bees.

This is the first confirmed sighting since last year, when a nest was discovered in the Tetbury area in Gloucestershire. That Asian hornet incursion was successfully contained by bee inspectors who promptly tracked down and destroyed the nest.

There is information on how to identify this new invasive species on the BEACON website here

The free Asian Hornet Watch reporting app, launched last March and downloaded 6500 times already, allows people to quickly and easily report possible sightings of the invasive species and send pictures of suspect insects to experts at the National Bee Unit.hornets European and Asian Identification

Sightings can also be reported to the National Bee Unit here.

For more information please visit the GB Non-Native Species Secretariat website

Tesco Bags of Help

BEACON is bidding to bag a massive cash boost from the Tesco Bags of Help initiative.

Tesco teamed up with Groundwork to launch its community funding scheme, which sees grants of £4,000, £2,000 and £1,000 – raised from carrier bag sales in Tesco stores – being awarded to local community projects.

Three groups in every Tesco region have been shortlisted to receive the cash award and shoppers are being invited to head along to Tesco stores to vote for who they think should take away the top grant.

BEACON’s ‘Love Your River Bollin’ is one of the groups on the shortlist.BEACON River Guardian Training

Any money raised will support BEACON to engage with more local people across the Bollin catchment, to raise awareness of value their local river, which will then foster a greater appreciation for it. We aim to highlight the impact people have on the water environment in a positive way to inspire people to change their behavior, and become guardians of their local river. We also aim to train more River Guardian volunteers to monitor water quality at their own ‘Adopt-A-Spot’ location along a stretch of the River Bollin or one of its tributaries.

Voting is open in all Tesco stores throughout September and October. Customers will cast their vote using a token given to them at the check-out in store each time they shop.

Tesco’s Bags of Help project has already delivered over £33 million to more than 6,400 projects up and down the UK.

To vote for  ‘Love Your River Bollin’, shop in one of the stores listed below and ask for a token at the checkout. Make sure to put your token in the ‘Love Your River Bollin’ box!

BRAMHALL     SK7 1JR
ALDERLEY RD SK9 1LH
HANDFORTH SK9 3PA
DEAN ROW RD SK9 2TA
WILMSLOW RD SK9 3HQ
ALDERLEY EDGE SK9 7JT

Environment Agency Bollin Valley Partnership Styal Balsam Bash

Co-Op Local Community Fund


BEACON is very pleased to have been chosen as one of the Co-op’s Local Community Fund causes for the next six months.  During this time, Co-op members can choose which of their local causes to support, and obviously we hope that you will support BEACON.

Every time Co-op members buy Co‑op branded products and services, from buying a loaf of bread to planning a funeral, 1% of their spend goes to a local cause.  For the six months that BEACON is part of the fund, the money builds up. Throughout the six months, members can choose which cause their contribution goes to.

BEACON is slowly building up its fund, which will be used to support the work of our River Rangers, and extend this scheme into other areas of the Bollin catchment.  We will be able to use the funds to train up volunteers, provide equipment to carry out simple water tests, speak to landowners about land management where there are problems identified, and also provide some Project Officer support.

To find out more about this, and to select BEACON as your Co-op local cause please click the link here

Invasive Species Week 2017

Get INNS-volved with Invasive Species week 2017 by supporting BEACON and finding out what you can do to help us control and eradicate invasive non-native species in the Bollin catchment.

You can follow BEACON’s progress with Invasive Species Week via our Facebook Page, where we will be posting lots of hints, tips and useful information.

You can also find out more about Invasive Species week on the GB Non-Native Species Secretariat website.

Asian Hornet – Vespa velutina

Asian HornetThe Asian Hornet (Vespa velutina) is the invasive non-native species to look out for at the moment.  It arrived in Britain, the first sighting being in Tetbury, last autumn, and at that time the hornets nests found in that area were successfully destroyed, and it is hoped that the population found last year has been eradicated.  However, this does not mean the war is over, even though that small battle was won.  Experts from the National Bee Unit believe that it is almost inevitable that there will be another invasion of Asian Hornets this year, and are asking the public to be vigilant.

The Asian Hornet originates from the area bordered by Northern India and China, and was first discovered in France in 2005, thought to have been transported in pottery that was imported from China.  The climate in the hornets native range is similar to that in Southern Europe, and may be the reason why is has spread rapidly.

hornets European and Asian Identification

European Hornet on the left, Asian Hornet on the right.

The Asian Hornet can potentially be a threat to people if they sting, but whilst the stings are painful, the hornets are not considered aggressive to people.  They main threat these invasive insects pose is to bees.  They predate social wasps and honeybees, and have been observed hovering over the entrance to bee hives waiting to charge and catch honeybees laden with pollen and nectar.  They eat the majority of the honeybee, and pulp the rest for larval food in the hornets own nest.  This is not good news for the honeybee, which is already under threat due to habitat loss and increase in intensive agricultural practices.  Asian Hornets also consume a wide variety of spiders and other insect prey.

 

You canhornets European and Asian Identification download a fact sheet which will enable you to identify the Asian Hornet here.

 

Advice for Beekeepers regarding this species can be found on BeeBase.

If you think you have seen an Asian Hornet please report your sighting here.